• How to Disassemble a Glock Pistol

    Part of gun ownership is understanding how to maintain it well. While it may occasionally require maintenance by a professional gun shop, the regular upkeep of your weapon is your responsibility as a gun owner.

    That means that it is important for you to understand how to safely disassemble your Glock for maintenance and cleaning

    Why You Need to Know How to Disassemble Your Glock Pistol

    There is a myriad of reasons why you should be familiar with disassembling your Glock.

    First among these is that you need to understand how to do it so that you can clean your pistol. Regularly cleaning your Glock is an essential element of gun ownership. It helps to prevent misfires and keeps your weapon accurate. A major component of cleaning and lubricating your Glock is disassembling it safely and properly. This has the added benefit of keeping your weapon in your hands and not in the repair shop.

    Taking apart your sidearm also helps you to better understand the weapon itself. You’ll know how it works, and what the moving piece is that is involved with firing your Glock. Externally, your pistol looks like a single, smooth until. Taking it apart allows you to experience the well-engineered machine that a Glock is.

    Being familiar with taking it apart and putting it back together will also assist you in identifying when the Glock may not be firing just right. If you are aware of the inner workings, when you re-assemble it after cleaning and test dry-fire it, you’ll know where to look if something feels off.

    How to Disassemble Your Glock and Clean It

    Do not complete steps 1 and 2 unless the process has your full attention. Unintentional discharges happen most frequently when clearing and dry firing a Glock when the user is not paying attention to the task at hand.

    Step 1: Clear the Pistol

    Before you begin cleaning your Glock pistol, you must make sure that you and all others around you are safe. This means ensuring that your pistol is unloaded before you begin to disassemble and clean it. You should also ensure that there is no ammunition in the area in which you are cleaning the weapon.

    Begin by safely removing the magazine with the gun facing away from you. It’s important to remove the magazine so that a round is not inadvertently loaded after checking the chamber.

    Once the magazine is removed, then rack the slide to eject any round that might be in the chamber.

    With no magazine in the well and the chamber cleared, lock the slide back and open. Check the chamber visually and with your finger, as well as the bolt face and the magazine well to verify that the gun has been completely cleared.

    Step 2: Reset the Trigger with a Dry-fire

    To disassemble a Glock pistol, the weapon must be dry-fired. That is why it is crucial to begin by verifying that the weapon is clear before continuing on.

    Point the gun away from you or any other people. Rack the slide and close the action. Ensure once more than the chamber is clear.

    While the slide is in battery, point the Glock pistol in a safe direction – again, away from you or where anyone else may be – and depress the trigger. You’ll feel the click of the firing pin. You cannot remove the slide if the trigger is not in the rearward position.

    Step Three: Disassemble the Glock Pistol

    Below are the basic steps for disassembling your Glock. However, you should also consult your owner’s manual for the manufacturer’s precise instructions regarding your model.

    When you disassemble the Glock pistol, you’ll be separating it into its four main components: the slide, the barrel, the guide rod/recoil spring assembly, and the frame/receiver.

    Remove the Slide

    While pointing the Glock in a safe direction, grasp the weapon with your fingers over the top of the rear portion of the slide and with your thumb under the slide and along the grip.

    Pull the slide lock down by grasping it on both sides with the thumb and forefinger of your other hand. Continue the downward pressure on the slide lock while releasing the slide, being careful the slide does not fall and impact a hard surface, as this could damage the guide ring.

    Remove the Recoil Spring and Barrel

    Once you’ve removed the slide, take the recoil spring out, and then remove the barrel.

    Slide Cover Plate

    Remove the slide cover plate by pushing down on the firing pin spacer sleeve, releasing it from the locked position. You can now slide the cover plate off with your thumb. If the slide cover plate is stiff – for instance, if the weapon is new – you can use a screwdriver to get it moving and then complete the action with your thumb.

    Next, remove the extractor depressor plunger and then the firing pin assembly. Push down on the firing pin safety to remove the extractor and then last the firing pin safety itself.

    Disassemble the Glock Receiver

    Remove the locking block pin, then the trigger pin. This may require working the slide stop lever back and forth. When reassembling your Glock you’ll want to make sure that the stop lever sits down in the notch on the trigger pin.

    You can now lift the slide stop lever out of the receiver. Next, remove the locking block by prying it up, then push out the trigger mechanism housing pin on the backstrap by pulling the trigger while the trigger bar is out.

    Source: Clipdraw

  • Glock vs Sig Sauer: Which is Better?

    When considering which pistol is the better one for you to buy, either as an addition to a budding collection, for home defense, or for personal defense, you may be wondering which is better – a Glock or a Sig Sauer? 

    Both of these handguns have their fans, and both have reasons that they are preferred. Both are accurate weapons, and a good value for the cost. Much of the decision will come down to personal preference, with the individual models that you look at (the Glock 17 or the Sig Sauer P226? The Glock 19 or the Sig Sauer P229?) making a difference. To make this decision, you should look at each weapon’s pros and cons in light of your intended use.

    A Look at Glock

    Glock is an Austrian weapons manufacturer founded by head engineer Gaston Glock in the early 1980s.

    Glock-17

    When he began engineering the Glock 17 in the 80s, Glock was new to weapon design. However, he was very familiar with advanced synthetic polymers. He assembled a group of specialists with the intent of designing a handgun for use by the Austrian Armed Forces in response to their announced search for a replacement for the P38, in use since World War II.

    Glocks use a high-strength, nylon-based polymer invented by their founder for the frame, magazine body, and other components. Polymer 2, as it’s called, is used to increase the Glock’s durability, making it more resilient than carbon steel and many steel alloys. The polymer makes the Glock resistant to extreme temperatures as well as caustic liquids.

    The handguns are produced by the original Glock company in Austria, as well as by Glock, Inc, a division located in the United States. The handguns made by Glock, Inc. are identical in every way to their Austrian counterparts, with the exception of being stamped with USA instead of AUSTRIA. 

    A Look at SIG Sauer

    Sig Sauer

    SIG Sauer is the super partnership between German company Schweizerische Industrie Gesellschaft (SIG) and Swiss company J.P. Sauer & Sohn. Formed in 1976, the American arm of the company was known as SIGARMS. which was moved to New Hampshire from Virginia in 1990. In 2000, the American division was separated organizationally from the parent company, SIG Sauer GmbH and renamed in 2007 to SIG Sauer, Inc.

    SIG Sauer has a much longer history than Glock, with its roots going back to 1853. In addition to pistols, the company makes or has made AR-15s, shotguns, hunting rifles, suppressors, ammunition, optics, and air guns.

    SIG Sauer weapons are used by militaries all over the world, in particular the P226. This handgun is used by the New York City and Houston police departments, the U.S. Secret service, the Texas Rangers, US Air Marshals, the US Navy SEALs) the Royal Thai Army, the Finish Army, and the Emergency Response Team of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, among others.

    Comparing the Glock and the SIG Sauer

    There are some general comparisons that can be made between these manufacturers’ weapons, but to truly evaluate Glock versus SIG Sauer you’ll need to look at the specs of the specific models. We’ll review two of the most commonly compared models – the Sig Sauer P229 with the Glock 19.

    Magazines

    For these two specific models, the Glock 19 holds more rounds than the P229, with the Glock holding 15 rounds to the SIG’s 13. Glock magazines can be more affordable than the SIG’s as well since they are very common and very widely available.

    Looks

    If you’ve seen a Glock and a SIG, you know that the SIG wins out in the looks category.

    The SIG P229 is a sleek, well-designed machine made from steel and with a variety of grips including rubber, wood, and plastic.

    The Glock on the other hand looks like… a Glock. It is boxy, simple, and clearly designed for function, not aesthetics. 

    Sights

    When it comes to sights, it’s hard to beat the SIG’s night sights. The Glock, by comparison, has standard U-shaped target sights. If you choose the Glock, you may want to consider upgrading the sights.

    Accuracy

    Most consider the accuracy of these two pistols to be highly comparable. How accurate you are with either one may be a factor more of how comfortable it is and how much time you spend at the range with it.

    Ergonomics

    Given the last category, this becomes more important. You’ll want your handgun to be comfortable and enjoyable to fire, so handling each of these guns before purchase is important.

    There is a weight difference between the weapons. The Glock’s polymer construction makes it the lighter choice. However, that means that when you are using a higher caliber, the SIG handles recoil better than the Glock does.

    If you are looking for a well-concealed carry weapon, or a lighter one, the Glock will edge out the SIG in this category. If you’re not planning on carrying it around day to day, definitely chose based on the feel of the grip and its comfort in your hand.

    Trigger

    Here is another area of difference between these two.

    The SIG’s initial shot has a longer trigger pull due to the double-action/single-action design with a hammer fire. This means that, after the initial shot, the weapon stays cocked for a lighter trigger pull. This makes it similar to the M9.

    The Glock, on the other hand, is striker-fired and pulls consistently every time. If you’d prefer a consistent feel on every trigger pull, the Glock may be the better choice for you.

    In the end, the choice between these two brands is largely about preference, comfort, use, and expectations. With both brands being good values for what they offer, and being reliable and accurate weapons, choosing between them is most likely to come down to which one you like the most.

  • How to Clean a Glock Pistol

    Your Glock pistol is an investment. You want to keep it not only looking good but in top working condition. Doing that means performing regular maintenance and cleaning.

    Why You Should Disassemble Your Glock Pistol and Clean It

    Safety is the most important tenant of gun ownership. That doesn’t just mean practicing safety on the range, however. It means keeping your weapon safe and in excellent working condition no matter when or where.

    As you use your pistol, particles from the gunpowder and bullet, called residual fouling, are released into your weapon. This residue sticks to your barrel, and applying lubricant and oil can make the problem worse. In addition, environmental dust and other outside dirt can get into your Glock.

    This causes several problems for the Glock gun owner. First, this gunk can foul up your weapon, gumming up the mechanisms and increasing the chance for a firing failure. It can also lead to needed repairs. All of this, of course, impacts the weapon’s reliability. 

    Additionally, this dirt can impact accuracy. Whether you keep your Glock around for sport, home defense, or self-defense, safety, reliability, and accuracy should all be concerned. Cleaning is how you keep all three of these important factors from becoming concerned.

    What You Need to Clean a Glock Pistol

    Preparation is an essential part of keeping your Glock clean. Knowing what materials you need and the process for disassembling a Glock pistol and cleaning it will simplify the process. Additionally, the more you clean it, the more familiar you will be with the process, and the easier it will become.

    First, be sure to read your owner’s manual completely before you begin. While we offer guidelines and tips within this article of how to clean your Glock, nothing should replace the instructions that came with your weapon. Those instructions will include precisely how to take apart your model of pistol safely and clean it.

    Once you are ready to begin cleaning, you’ll need the following tools and materials:

    • A cleaning rod
    • Cleaning solvent
    • Cleaning patches
    • A slotted top that screws onto your rod
    • Lubricant/lubricating oil
    • Clean rags
    • Cotton swabs
    • A brush (a toothbrush dedicated to this task works well)
    • Safety goggles
    • Latex gloves
    • Copper or brass bore brush for your caliber

    You can also find gun cleaning kits that will include many of the items listed above.

    How to Disassemble Your Glock and Clean It

    Do not complete steps 1 and 2 unless the process has your full attention. Unintentional discharges happen most frequently when clearing and dry firing a Glock when the user is not paying attention to the task at hand.

    Step 1: Safety First

    Before you begin cleaning your Glock pistol, you must make sure that you and all others around you are safe. This means ensuring that your pistol is unloaded before you begin to disassemble and clean it. You should also ensure that there is no ammunition in the area in which you are cleaning the weapon.

    Begin by safely removing the magazine with the gun facing away from you. It’s important to remove the magazine so that a round is not inadvertently loaded after checking the chamber.

    Once the magazine is removed, then rack the slide to eject any round that might be in the chamber.

    With no magazine in the well and the chamber cleared, lock the slide back and open. Check the chamber visually and with your finger, as well as the bolt face and the magazine well to verify that the gun has been completely cleared.

    Step 2: Dry Fire

    To disassemble a Glock pistol, the weapon must be dry-fired. That is why it is crucial to begin by verifying that the weapon is clear before continuing on.

    Point the gun away from you or any other people. Rack the slide and close the action. Ensure once more than the chamber is clear.

    While the slide is in battery, point the Glock pistol in a safe direction – again, away from you or where anyone else may be – and depress the trigger. You’ll feel the click of the firing pin. You cannot remove the slide if the trigger is not in the rearward position.

    Step Three: Disassemble the Glock Pistol

    Following the steps in your owner’s manual, disassemble the Glock pistol into its four main components: the slide, the barrel, the guide rod/recoil spring assembly, and the frame/receiver. 

    Step Four: Clean the Barrel

    The barrel is where the majority of the dirt, grime, carbon, and residual fouling will accumulate. 

    Going in the direction from the chamber to the muzzle, push a dry brush through the barrel. This will dislodge a good portion of the dirt and grime.

    Run the brush back and forth through the barrel a half dozen times or so, until debris stops coming out.

    Next, add some gun cleaner to a cleaning patch. Repeat the same action you used with the dry brush, but now with the cleaning patch, working from chamber to muzzle.

    Using a clean patch with gun cleaner on it, clean the feed ramps of the chamber and then wipe down the outside of the barrel. Now wipe down the outside of the barrel with your rag to remove any extra cleaner, and run a few dry patches through the barrel to do the same.

    Visually examine the barrel to make sure all of the debris has been removed, inside and out. The barrel should be shiny and uniform. However, if there are a few stubborn spots you shouldn’t stress out about them. Simply get it as clean as you can.

    Step Five: Clean the Recoil Spring, Guide Rod, and Slide

    The recoil spring and guide rod are easy to clean. Simply brush these and then wipe them down using a towel or rag.

    Cleaning the slide is a bit more involved. Wrap a patch around the bristles of the brush and, focusing on the rear, scrub the inside of the slide. Wipe down the slide as well, again concentrating on the rear, which accumulates fouling and build-up.

    Concentrate on the inside of the rails, cleaning any build-up there with a cotton swab. 

    Next, clean the breach face by pointing the muzzle end toward the floor and brush it clean. By angling it towards the floor you will prevent knocking debris into the rear of the slide.

    Step Six: Clean the Frame of the Glock

    Cleaning the frame is the easy part. For this, you can give the frame of your Glock a good wipe down and scrubbing, including to the top of the frame, the slide rails, and the trigger bar. If there is grime in the slide rails, wipe them down with a patch and cleaner and use your rag to wipe off the cleaner after that.

    The magazine rarely needs to be cleaned, but if it does you can find instructions on how to disassemble a Glock magazine for cleaning in your owner’s manual as well.

    Once cleaned, you can lubricate your pistol and reassemble it.

    Lubricate Your Glock Pistol

    Glocks do not require a lot of lubricant, and in fact, works better when lubricated with a light touch.

    Starting with the barrel, put some lubricant on a clean patch and run it through just as you did to clean it. Then run a dry patch through it the same way. Apply a small amount of lubricant to the outside of the barrel as well and apply it across the surface, then wipe it down with your rag. 

    You’ll also want to apply lubricant in some very specific places:

    • Between the lugs on the bottom of the barrel
    • Where the barrel interfaces with the slide
    • On the slide where it meets the barrel
    • On the front of the slide where the barrel comes through
    • On the slide rails, spreading with a patch
    • The slide rails on the frame
    • The raised metal bar that interfaces with the trigger bar on the rear of the frame

    Be sure to wipe everything down afterward with your rag to remove any excess.

    Once you have finished lubricating the pistol’s parts you are done. Reassemble the Glock, starting with the barrel, guide rod, and recoil spring, placing them back into the slide and the slide back into the frame.

    Once reassembled, point your Glock in a safe direction and dry fire once more to ensure that your Glock is functioning properly, nothing feels gritty, and the trigger is resetting. Add your left hand or right hand Clipdraw Belt Clip & SAF-T-BLOK Combo today.

    Source: Clipdraw

  • Glock, Gun of Choice

    Today the Glock pistol has become the gun of choice for both criminals and law enforcement in the United States.

    In his book Glock: The Rise of America’s Gun, Paul Barrett traces how the sleek, high-capacity Austrian weapon found its way into Hollywood films and rap lyrics, not to mention two-thirds of all U.S. police departments.

    The Glock was created in 1982 by curtain-rod manufacturer Gaston Glock. Glock didn’t like the handguns available on the market and decided to manufacture a new gun from scratch. Before starting, he asked gun experts in his native Austria what could be done to improve a handgun for the modern era.

    “They said, ‘A gun with much larger ammunition capacity, a gun that is much more durable and reliable … [and] the gun should be easy to fire [and] easy to learn how to use,'” Barrett tells Fresh Air‘s Terry Gross. “He integrated all of those elements into the Glock, and that’s how he won his original contract with the Austrian army.”

    The original Glock 17, the model adopted by the Austrian army, contained only 36 parts and could hold 17 bullets in its magazine. It didn’t have an external safety like other semiautomatic handguns. It also didn’t have a decocking mechanism. The result? A lightweight, interchangeable model that could be dropped, submerged and subjected to temperature extremes — and still accurately fire.

    source: npr